Engaged Scholar Critical Community Engagement Roundtable

Fall 2018 Theme: Decolonizing Practices within a Colonial Institution

Co-Sponsored by the Office for Public Engagement and the Department of American Indian Studies

All sessions meet from 3:00 to 4:30 in 125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education


Sept. 11: What is Decolonization?  

What is decolonization? (Neil Cantemaza McKay, Senior Dakota Language Specialist, American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities)

October 9: Re-Indigenizing Relationships Between Sky & Earth

Re-Indigenizing Relationships Between Sky & Earth (Jim Rock (Dakota), Program Director of the Marshall W. Alworth, Planetarium at the University of Minnesota Duluth)
 
November 6: Native Pacific Watercraft in Dakota Water and Skyways: Transindigenous Cultural Revitalization in Rural Southwest Minnesota Communities as Vessel for Decolonizing Academic Practice  
(Prof. Vince Diaz, Department of American Indian Studies; Adam Savariego, MPH, Upper Sioux; Mat Pendleton, Director, Lower Sioux Recreation Center)
 
December 4: TBA
 

Spring 2018 Theme: Decolonization and Higher Education Governance

Co-Sponsored by the Office for Public Engagement and the Department of American Indian Studies

All sessions meet from 3:00 to 4:30 in 125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education


“This is not simply a call for the creation of university-community ‘partnerships,’ nor a call for engaging in tourist forms of activist-scholarship, much less a redeployment of more academic conferences - In becoming both participants and students of grassroots research collectives, we enter spaces of struggle and solidarity in the deepest sense possible, generating historically new accounts and practices that can respond locally to colonialism, thus generating spaces of recovery and healing that become the fertile soil for seeds of inquiry and research that are inherently political, ethical, and accountable to the communities that make research possible. And it is thus how we begin to reclaim our research: by first decolonizing the spaces that make research possible, our identities are also transformed...” 

--Zavala, Miguel. (2013). "What do we mean by decolonizing research strategies? Lessons from decolonizing, indigenous research projects in New Zealand and Latin American." Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society, Vol. 2, No. 1, pp.55-71.

 

February 6: The American Indian Advisory Council at the University of Minnesota 

Tadd Johnson is Director of the Master of Tribal Administration and Governance (MTAG) program and Professor in the Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota Duluth. Professor Johnson has served as a tribal attorney, a tribal court judge, and a tribal administrator.  He has held the positions of staff director and counsel to the Subcommittee on Native American Affairs of the U.S. House of Representatives and the  Chair of the National Indian Gaming Commission.  He is an enrolled member of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Bois Forte Band.  

 

March 6: Iisaaksiichaa Ross Braine (Apsaalooke Nation) is director of wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ – Intellectual House at the University of Washington, a multi-service learning and gathering space for Native American students, faculty and staff, and the greater UW community.  

 

April 3: University of Saskatchewan Vice-Provost Indigenous Engagement Jacqueline Ottmann and Vice-Provost Teaching, Learning and Student Experience Patricia McDougall will lead April's Engaged Scholar Critical Community Engagement Roundtable. The discussion will focus on the University's decolonization initiatives in the areas of curriculum, student support, research and knowledge production, and university governance.

May 1: TBA

 

Fall 2017 Theme: Colonial Roots of Academic Theory

Co-Sponsored by the Office for Public Engagement and the Department of American Indian Studies

September 12:  What is decolonization? (Neil Cantemaza McKay, Senior Dakota Language Specialist, American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities)

 

October 3:  Examining the colonial roots of theory in social science:  Anthropology/Archaeology (Katherine Hayes, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Chair of the Department of American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities)

 

November 7:  Examining the colonial roots of theory in the humanities:  Philosophy (Naomi Scheman, Professor Emerita, Departments of Philosophy and Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies)

 

December 5: First, Do No Harm: Colonization and the Weaponization of Medicine (Wicanhpi Iyotan Win Autumn Cavender-Wilson, CPM/LTM)

The process of colonization necessitates the destruction and replacement of every social system of the colonized with those of the colonizer.  During the conquest of the Americas, western medicine was undergoing a revolution, and steps forward frequently came at the expense of Indigenous populations and their respective medical practices.  Examining medical colonization through the lens of obstetrics and gynecology, this presentation will address the ways in which medical experimentation, research, training and practice were, and continue to be, weaponized to manufacture the perinatal health disparities we see in Indigenous populations today, and the ways in which modern medical professionals have become agents of ethnocide, genocide and colonization.  Conversely, we will explore the ways in which medical professionals have the ability to reverse this dynamic, and work towards a more just and equitable system of health care.

The process of colonization necessitates the destruction and replacement of every social system of the colonized with those of the colonizer.  During the conquest of the Americas, western medicine was undergoing a revolution, and steps forward frequently came at the expense of Indigenous populations and their respective medical practices.  Examining medical colonization through the lens of obstetrics and gynecology, this presentation will address the ways in which medical experimentation, research, training and practice were, and continue to be, weaponized to manufacture the perinatal health disparities we see in Indigenous populations today, and the ways in which modern medical professionals have become agents of ethnocide, genocide and colonization.  Conversely, we will explore the ways in which medical professionals have the ability to reverse this dynamic, and work towards a more just and equitable system of health care.

Bio:  Wicanhpi Iyotan Win Autumn Cavender-Wilson is Wahpetunwan Dakota from Pezihutazizi K’api Makoce (Upper Sioux reservation).  The first Dakota midwife to practice in Pezihutazizi since her great-great grandmother was driven out of practice, Autumn has dedicated herself to the revitalization of indigenous midwifery, believing it to be an inherent part of both addressing indigenous/rural perinatal health disparities and to re-establishing indigenous sovereignty.  In addition to midwifery practice, she remains an indigenous language revitalization advocate and a fierce decolonization activist.  She resides and practices near her home community with her husband (an indigenous food sovereignty specialist), and her 2-year-old son, who was born in the first planned home birth in her community in over half a century.

 

All year:  We encourage participants to work with colleagues to form your own group to examine the colonial roots of theories in your discipline.  Seek guidance from a mentor, and share what you have learned with others. Contact Sara Axtell (axtel002@umn.edu) if interested.