Engaged Scholar Critical Community Engagement Roundtable

2018-2019 Theme: Decolonizing Practices within a Colonial Institution

Co-sponsored by the University's Office for Public Engagement and Department of American Indian Studies

What Comes Next before What Comes Next: Moving (Carefully) from Discussion to Action—3 to 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, May 7/ 125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Department of American Indian Studies Senior Dakota Language Specialist Cantemaza Neil McKay and Center for Community-Engaged Learning Assistant Director Monica Siems McKay will lead the next Engaged Scholar Critical Community Engagement Roundtable.  As the third year of the Decolonization series comes to a close, many are holding questions about how to best create positive change on our campus. How do we engage in a process of land acknowledgement?  What does tribal consultation look like?  How can we undertake thoughtful, respectful, and strategic action for decolonization?  This session will share stories of institutions engaging in decolonizing practices, and offer pathways for participants to integrate personal and collective action into our daily lives.

Ginibiminaan: Teachings from Indigenous Women Water Walkers, Protectors, and Educators—3 to 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, April 2/ 125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Roxanne Biidabinokwe Gould, assistant professor in the Education Department at the Ruth A. Myers Center for Indigenous Education and Environmental Education at the University of Minnesota Duluth, will lead the next Engaged Scholar Critical Community Engagement Roundtable. The session will focus on Gould's research on Indigenous women's water practices, teachings, and resistance to destruction of ginibiminaan, "our water." This research will include interviews and ideas from Indigenous homelands where water is scarce, from homelands where water is abundant but contaminated, and homelands which are being impacted by rising sea levels due to climate change.

 

Counter-Memory in the ‘World Upside-Down:’ Settler-Indigenous (Ir)reconciliation in Mni Sota Macoce—3 to 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, March 5/ 125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

This Engaged Scholar Critical Community Engagement Roundtable will be led by Sam Grey, a researcher, author, and consultant whose work deals with peacebuilding, reconciliation, and historical justice among Indigenous and Settler peoples.The term ‘reconciliation,’ used to describe a political project aimed at coming to terms with the past in Settler-colonial states, is invariably traced to the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission. What few people realize is that this usage originates not in Johannesburg in 1996, but a full decade earlier, in Marshall, Minnesota. Pushback from Settler groups, counter-campaigns from amateur historians, and hesitancy and half-measures on the part of official bodies make Mni Sota Macoke/Minnesota not only a unique, underexamined iteration of, but also a critical case study in – and test of – Indigenous-Settler reconciliation.

Boarding School Research, Oral Histories, and Data Sovereignty, Oh My!—3 to 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, February 5/ 125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

Christine Diindiisi McCleave (Turtle Mountain Ojibwe), executive officer of the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition (NABS), will lead the next Engaged Scholar Critical Community Engagement Roundtable. The session will focus on NABS’s work on data sovereignty. What practices and protocols are indigenous nations putting into place to protect the sovereignty of their data? What protocols do academic institutions need to follow to honor this sovereignty?

Where We Stand: The University of Minnesota and Dakota Treaty Lands—3 to 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, December 4/  125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education University of Minnesota, Twin Cities

The University of Minnesota campus is often described as Dakota homeland, and the practice of acknowledging the indigenous peoples of the places where we stand is becoming more common. What if this is not just Dakota homeland, but is land that still rightfully -- and legally -- belongs to the Dakota people? What action does that acknowledgement require? Department of American Indian Studies Senior Dakota Language Specialist Neil Cantemaza McKay and Assistant Director of the Center of Community-Engaged Learning Monica Siems McKay will lead a discussion focusing on decolonization and community-engaged scholarship. The session will explore the history of treaties that include campus lands and federal land grants to the University, and will locate the University within the overall colonization of Minnesota.

Native Pacific Watercraft in Dakota Water and Skyways Transindigenous Cultural Revitalization in Rural Southwest Minnesota Communities as a Vessel for Decolonizing Academic Practice—3 to 4:30 p.m., Tuesday, November 6/ 125 Nolte Center for Continuing Education University of Minnesota, Twin Cities​

Department of American Indian Studies Associate Professor Vince Diaz, Yellow Medicine East High School Community Cultural Liaison Adam Savariego, and Lower Sioux Recreation Center Director Mat Pendleton will lead the next Engaged Scholar Critical Community Engagement Roundtable. The session will focus on an ongoing community-based research and teaching/learning program that partners efforts by displaced Micronesian Islanders in Milan, Minnesota with those of Upper and Lower Sioux Dakota to revitalize their indigenous water craft and water/sky-oriented traditional ecological knowledge. What can community-based efforts to revitalize and share distinct traditional technology and knowledge teach scholars and researchers interested in decolonizing the academy?

Re-Indigenizing Relationships Between Sky & Earth—4 to 5:30 p.m., Tuesday, October 9/ Bell Museum Planetarium University of Minnesota, Twin Cities​

Professor Jim Rock  will lead the next Engaged Scholar Critical Community Engagement Roundtable at the Bell Museum Planetarium from 4 to 5:30 p.m., focusing on Dakota cosmology and indigenous communal methodology of “Kapemni," or mirroring.  Rock will explore how this mirroring concept can restore and heal personal and communal feminine connections to better ground and balance communities through transformation and challenges. Rock (Dakota) has taught astronomy, chemistry, and physics for over thirty years to thousands of students at universities and high schools in urban, suburban, and reservation communities. At the University of Minnesota Duluth, Rock is a faculty member of the Physics and Astronomy Department and of the Center for Indigenous Education. He also serves as the program director of the Marshall W. Alworth Planetarium and as co-advisor of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. Rock designed and was principal investigator of the first Native American experiment conducted during NASA’s STS-135 Atlantis Mission, and acted as a consultant on the NASA-Beautiful Earth Team to expand opportunities in space education for indigenous teachers.

 

Spring 2018 Theme: Decolonization and Higher Education Governance


February 6: The American Indian Advisory Council at the University of Minnesota 

Tadd Johnson is Director of the Master of Tribal Administration and Governance (MTAG) program and Professor in the Department of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota Duluth. Professor Johnson has served as a tribal attorney, a tribal court judge, and a tribal administrator.  He has held the positions of staff director and counsel to the Subcommittee on Native American Affairs of the U.S. House of Representatives and the  Chair of the National Indian Gaming Commission.  He is an enrolled member of the Minnesota Chippewa Tribe, Bois Forte Band. 

March 6: Iisaaksiichaa Ross Braine (Apsaalooke Nation) is director of wǝɫǝbʔaltxʷ – Intellectual House at the University of Washington, a multi-service learning and gathering space for Native American students, faculty and staff, and the greater UW community. 

April 3: University of Saskatchewan Vice-Provost Indigenous Engagement Jacqueline Ottmann and Vice-Provost Teaching, Learning and Student Experience Patricia McDougall will lead April's Engaged Scholar Critical Community Engagement RoundtableThe discussion will focus on the University's decolonization initiatives in the areas of curriculum, student support, research and knowledge production, and university governance.

May 1: TBA

 

Fall 2017 Theme: Colonial Roots of Academic Theory

Co-Sponsored by the Office for Public Engagement and the Department of American Indian Studies

September 12:  What is decolonization? (Neil Cantemaza McKay, Senior Dakota Language Specialist, American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities)

 

October 3:  Examining the colonial roots of theory in social science:  Anthropology/Archaeology (Katherine Hayes, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Chair of the Department of American Indian Studies, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities)

 

November 7:  Examining the colonial roots of theory in the humanities:  Philosophy (Naomi Scheman, Professor Emerita, Departments of Philosophy and Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies)

 

December 5: First, Do No Harm: Colonization and the Weaponization of Medicine (Wicanhpi Iyotan Win Autumn Cavender-Wilson, CPM/LTM)

The process of colonization necessitates the destruction and replacement of every social system of the colonized with those of the colonizer.  During the conquest of the Americas, western medicine was undergoing a revolution, and steps forward frequently came at the expense of Indigenous populations and their respective medical practices.  Examining medical colonization through the lens of obstetrics and gynecology, this presentation will address the ways in which medical experimentation, research, training and practice were, and continue to be, weaponized to manufacture the perinatal health disparities we see in Indigenous populations today, and the ways in which modern medical professionals have become agents of ethnocide, genocide and colonization.  Conversely, we will explore the ways in which medical professionals have the ability to reverse this dynamic, and work towards a more just and equitable system of health care.

The process of colonization necessitates the destruction and replacement of every social system of the colonized with those of the colonizer.  During the conquest of the Americas, western medicine was undergoing a revolution, and steps forward frequently came at the expense of Indigenous populations and their respective medical practices.  Examining medical colonization through the lens of obstetrics and gynecology, this presentation will address the ways in which medical experimentation, research, training and practice were, and continue to be, weaponized to manufacture the perinatal health disparities we see in Indigenous populations today, and the ways in which modern medical professionals have become agents of ethnocide, genocide and colonization.  Conversely, we will explore the ways in which medical professionals have the ability to reverse this dynamic, and work towards a more just and equitable system of health care.